Book Haul/Spotlight – Zothique by Clark Ashton Smith

 

 

 

I have been adding many new books to my collection recently. My interest in reading has shifted to older books and authors. So I thought instead of just a simple book haul post I would do more of a spotlight/introduction post as well. So in the post below you will not only find the usual book haul photo’s, but book and author info as well. I hope you will take the time to look it over and maybe take a chance at checking out books and authors that you may have forgot about or discover in these post!

I found this copy on a Instagram/Facebook page I follow. Collectible Science Fiction were great to work with, fair prices, and it didn’t take forever to get my books. They have great Vintage paperbacks, you should go check them out.

 Collectible Science Fiction

https://www.instagram.com/collectiblesciencefiction/?hl=en

https://www.facebook.com/CollectibleScienceFiction/

 

Today we have:

Zothique – Ballantine Books PB (1970)

by Clark Ashton Smith

 


 

 

 

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I really need some more CAS!

 

 


 

 

Zothique is a collection of fantasy short stories by Clark Ashton Smith, edited by Lin Carter. It was first published in paperback by Ballantine Books as the sixteenth volume of its Ballantine Adult Fantasy series in June 1970. It was the first themed collection of Smith’s works assembled by Carter for the series. The stories were originally published in various fantasy magazines in the 1930s, notably Weird Tales.

The book collects one poem and all sixteen tales of the author’s Zothique cycle, set on the Earth’s last continent in a far distant future, with an introduction and map and epilogue by Carter.

Contents:

  • “Introduction: When the World Grows Old”, by Lin Carter
  • “Zothique” (poem)
  • “Xeethra”
  • “Necromancy in Naat”
  • “The Empire of the Necromancers”
  • “The Master of the Crabs”
  • “The Death of Ilalotha”
  • “The Weaver in the Vault”
  • “The Witchcraft of Ulua”
  • “The Charnel God”
  • The Dark Eidolon
  • “Morthylla”
  • “The Black Abbot of Puthuum”
  • “The Tomb-Spawn”
  • “The Last Hieroglyph”
  • “The Isle of the Torturers”
  • “The Garden of Adompha”
  • “The Voyage of King Euvoran”
  • “Epilogue: The Sequence of the Zothique Tales”, by Lin Carter

 

 

Clark Ashton Smith (January 13, 1893 – August 14, 1961) was a self-educated American poet, sculptor, painter and author of fantasyhorror and science fiction short stories. He achieved early local recognition, largely through the enthusiasm of George Sterling, for traditional verse in the vein of Swinburne. As a poet, Smith is grouped with the West Coast Romantics alongside Joaquin Miller, Sterling, Nora May French, and remembered as “The Last of the Great Romantics” and “The Bard of Auburn”.

Smith was one of “the big three of Weird Tales, with Robert E. Howard and H. P. Lovecraft“, but some readers objected to his morbidness and violation of pulp traditions. The fantasy critic L. Sprague de Camp said of him that “nobody since Poe has so loved a well-rotted corpse.” Smith was a member of the Lovecraft circle and his literary friendship with Lovecraft lasted from 1922 until Lovecraft’s death in 1937. His work is marked by an extraordinarily rich and ornate vocabulary, a cosmic perspective and a vein of sardonic and sometimes ribald humor.

Of his writing style, Smith stated that: “My own conscious ideal has been to delude the reader into accepting an impossibility, or series of impossibilities, by means of a sort of verbal black magic, in the achievement of which I make use of prose-rhythm, metaphor, simile, tone-color, counter-point, and other stylistic resources, like a sort of incantation.

 

– From Wikipedia

 

 


 

 

 

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