Book Haul – The Dark Angel by Seabury Quinn

 

 

 

The wonderful people over at Night Shade Books were awesome enough to send me a copy of this fantastic book! Thanks Night Shade Books! I can’t wait to check it out.

 

The Dark Angel: The Complete Tales of Jules de Grandin, Volume Three

by Seabury Quinn

IS OUT NOW!

So go get your copy!

 

 


 

 

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The Dark Angel: The Complete Tales of Jules de Grandin, Volume Three

by Seabury Quinn

 

The third of five volumes collecting the stories of Jules de Grandin, the supernatural detective made famous in the classic pulp magazine Weird Tales.

Today the names of H. P. Lovecraft, Robert E. Howard, August Derleth, and Clark Ashton Smith, all regular contributors to the pulp magazine Weird Tales during the first half of the twentieth century, are recognizable even to casual readers of the bizarre and fantastic. And yet despite being more popular than them all during the golden era of genre pulp fiction, there is another author whose name and work have fallen into obscurity: Seabury Quinn.

Quinn’s short stories were featured in well more than half of Weird Tales‘s original publication run. His most famous character, the supernatural French detective Dr. Jules de Grandin, investigated cases involving monsters, devil worshippers, serial killers, and spirits from beyond the grave, often set in the small town of Harrisonville, New Jersey. In de Grandin there are familiar shades of both Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes and Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot, and alongside his assistant, Dr. Samuel Trowbridge, de Grandin’s knack for solving mysteries―and his outbursts of peculiar French-isms (grand Dieu!)―captivated readers for nearly three decades.
Collected for the first time in trade editions, The Complete Tales of Jules de Grandin, edited by George Vanderburgh, presents all ninety-three published works featuring the supernatural detective. Presented in chronological order over five volumes, this is the definitive collection of an iconic pulp hero.

The third volume, The Dark Angel, includes all of the Jules de Grandin stories from “The Lost Lady” (1931) to “The Hand of Glory” (1933), as well as “The Devil’s Bride”, the only novel featuring de Grandin, which was originally serialized over six issues of Weird Tales.

 

 

 


 

 

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Weird Tales was, in its day, the proving ground for several popular authors of weird fiction. Who would you say was its most popular— HPL? REH? CAS? It was this man. Seabury Grandin Quinn (aka Jerome Burke; December 1889 – 24 December 1969) was a frequent contributor to Weird Tales, an author of some five hundred short stories (and one novel, Alien Flesh, published posthumously in 1977). His most successful creation was the occult investigator Jules de Grandin, who featured in over ninety stories published between 1925 and 1951 (including a novella, The Devil’s Bride). Several of his stories tied or even beat out more currently-known works of Howard or Lovecraft in reader surveys. He also had a most oddly suitable day job for a Weird Tales author; he edited Casket and Sunnyside, the trade journal for the American Undertakers’ Association. So what happened? Hard to say. After his death, many of the Grandin stories were put out in mass-market paperback compilations from Popular Library in the early 1970s, but reprints were never done, and recent collections of his work have been in much smaller runs by independent publishers. A few of his stories have entered the public domain and can be found with searching, and many individual stories have been reprinted in various horror and weird fiction anthologies.

Starting in 2017, Night Shade Books will be reprinting the Jules de Grandin stories in a five-volume collected edition.

 

 


 

 

 

3 thoughts on “Book Haul – The Dark Angel by Seabury Quinn

  1. Pingback: Week in Review: 4/21/18 – Mighty Thor JRS – Fantasy Book News & Reviews

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