Book Haul/Spotlight – Teutonic Myth and Legend by Donald A. Mackenzie

 

 

 

In addition to my love of Fantasy/Sword and Sorcery books, I also love to collect books related to Norse Mythology, Vikings, and Asatru.

I have always been interested in these subjects and when I can find some of these books I don’t have I always snatch them up.

I found this amazing book at my favorite local “collector” book store. Mike over at Book Gallery in Phoenix always has the best books. Great to talk to him when I make the trip to his shop. Such a wealth of knowledge. Check him out if you are ever in Phoenix.

Book Gallery

3643 E Indian School Rd, Phoenix, AZ 85018  

602-508-0280

https://www.abebooks.com/book-gallery-mike-riley-phoenix-az/546297/sf

So today’s book haul is:

Teutonic Myth and Legend

by Donald A. Mackenzie

Originally Published: 1912

 

 


 

 

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Teutonic Myth and Legend

by Donald A. Mackenzie

Originally Published: 1912

“Teutonic Myth and Legend” applies to the ancient religious conceptions and traditional tales of the “non-Celtic” northern peoples, whom Continental scholars prefer to call “Germanic” in the widest sense of the term. The myths varied in different districts and at different periods. It is doubtful if there ever was in any particular age complete uniformity of religious belief over a wide area of separated States. In fact, there are indications that sects and creeds were at least as numerous among Teutonic peoples in early times as at the present day. Stories repeated orally were also subject to change; they were influenced by popular taste, and rendered more effective by the introduction of local colouring.

Teutonic Mythology survives in its most concrete form in Scandinavian literature. On that account it has to be considered from the northern point of view, although much of it is clearly not of northern origin. Our principal sources of knowledge of this great Pagan religious system are the two Eddas of Iceland.

These Eddas are collections of mythical and heroic poems and stories. One is called the Elder or Poetic Edda; the other, Snorri’s or the Prose Edda. The latter was discovered first; it came into the possession of appreciative scholars in the seventeenth century, by whom it was studied and carefully preserved.

 

This is Donald Mackenzie’s able retelling of the Northern mythological cycle. He weaves a coherent narrative from the Eddas, the Niebelunglied, the Volsung Saga, Beowulf, the primordial Hamlet myths, and Medieval German tales of chivalry. –J.B. Hare

 

INTRODUCTION

xvii

I.

STORY OF CREATION

1

II.

THE NINE WORLDS

11

III.

THE DEEDS OF ODIN

21

IV.

HOW EVIL ENTERED ASGARD

29

V.

THE WINTER WAR

44

VI.

TRIUMPH OF LOVE

53

VII.

THE LOST SWORD OF VICTORY

64

VIII.

FALL OF ASGARD

72

IX.

THE GODS RECONCILED

82

X.

LOKE’S EVIL PROGENY

90

XI.

THOR’S GREAT FISHING

98

XII.

THE CITY OF ENCHANTMENTS

112

XIII.

THOR IN PERIL

126

XIV.

THE GREAT STONE GIANT

137

XV.

BALDER THE BEAUTIFUL

146

XVI.

THE BINDING OF LORE

165

XVII.

THE DUSK OF THE GODS

177

XVIII.

THE COMING OF BEOWULF

187

XIX.

CONFLICT WITH DEMONS

197

XX.

BEOWULF AND THE DRAGON

210

XXI.

HOTHER AND BALDER

221

XXII.

THE TRADITIONAL HAMLET

232

p. xii

XXIII.

HAMLET’S STORM-MILL

246

XXIV.

LAND OF THE NOT-DEAD AND MANY MARVELS

254

XXV.

THE DOOM OF THE VOLSUNGS

282

XXVI.

HOW SIGMUND WAS AVENGED

292

XXVII.

HELGI HUNDINGSBANE

299

XXVIII.

SIGURD THE DRAGON SLAYER

309

XXIX.

BRYNHILD AND GUDRUN

322

XXX.

THE LAST OF THE VOLSUNGS

338

XXXI.

GUDRUN’S VENGEANCE

343

XXXII.

SIEGFRIED AND THE NIBELUNGS

354

XXXIII.

THE PROMISE OF KRIEMHILD

362

XXXIV.

HOW BRUNHILD AND KRIEMHILD WERE WON

372

XXXV.

THE BETRAYAL OF SIEGFRIED

382

XXXVI.

THE NIBELUNGEN TRAGEDY

391

XXXVII.

DIETRICH OF BERN

404

XXXVIII.

THE LAND OF GIANTS

415

XXXIX.

THE WONDERFUL ROSE GARDEN

424

XL.

VIRGINAL, QUEEN OF THE MOUNTAINS

434

XLI.

DIETRICH IN EXILE

439

XLII.

THE KING’S HOMECOMING

 

Info from Sacred Texts

 

 


 

 

 

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